Jonathan Harnisch Podcast

27
Jun

In Brief: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

I have made improvements with some excellent cognitive behavioral therapy sessions for my mental health conditions. This 20 minute video shows some of the improvements I have been making. As my psychologist puts it, “It may always be an ongoing challenge, but there is a learning curve and there is improvement."

Cognitive behavioral therapy (also known by its abbreviation, CBT) is a short-term, goal-oriented psychotherapy treatment that takes a hands-on, practical approach to problem-solving. Its goal is to change patterns of thinking or behavior that are behind people’s difficulties, and so change the way they feel. It is used to help treat a wide range of issues in a person’s life, from sleeping difficulties or relationship problems, to drug and alcohol abuse or anxiety and depression. CBT works by changing people’s attitudes and their behavior by focusing on the thoughts, images, beliefs and attitudes that we hold (our cognitive processes) and how this relates to the way we behave, as a way of dealing with emotional problems.

An important advantage of cognitive behavioral therapy is that it tends to be short, taking four to seven months for most emotional problems. Clients attend one session per week, each session lasting approximately 50 minutes. During this time, the client and therapist are working together to understand what the problems are and to develop a new strategy for tackling them. CBT introduces them to a set of principles that they can apply whenever they need to, and which will stand them in good stead throughout their lives.

Cognitive behavioral therapy can be thought of as a combination of psychotherapy and behavioral therapy. Psychotherapy emphasizes the importance of the personal meaning we place on things and how thinking patterns begin in childhood. Behavioral therapy pays close attention to the relationship between our problems, our behavior and our thoughts.

— Psych Central
Psych Central is an independent mental health social network.
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27
Jun

Outsider Art 50s TV: No Longer Not Yet

The term outsider art was coined by art critic Roger Cardinal in 1972 as an English synonym for art Brut, "raw art" or "rough art", a label created by French artist Jean Dubuffet to describe art created outside the boundaries of official culture; Dubuffet focused particularly on art by those on the outside of the established art scene, such as a psychiatric hospital patients and children. — Wikipedia
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27
Jun

Outsider Art: No Longer Not Yet

The term outsider art was coined by art critic Roger Cardinal in 1972 as an English synonym for art Brut, "raw art" or "rough art", a label created by French artist Jean Dubuffet to describe art created outside the boundaries of official culture; Dubuffet focused particularly on art by those on the outside of the established art scene, such as a psychiatric hospital patients and children. — Wikipedia
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26
Jun

Always Do Your Best: Therapy Thursday, June 25, 2015

Always do your best; after all, it's all we can do.

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19
Jun

The Domino Effect

An inside look into a therapy session with a person diagnosed with mental illness. A domino effect or chain reaction is the cumulative effect produced when one event sets off a chain of similar events. As it applies to mental health take an inside look into a therapy session with a person diagnosed with mental illness particularly schizophrenia. For more on iTunes - Podcasts - Schizophrenia Raw by Jonathan Harnisch download past episodes or subscribe to future episodes for free from Schizophrenia Raw by Jonathan Harnisch on the iTunes Store. Thank you for your continued support.

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12
Jun

Reflections on Mental Illness

Experience an inside look into a therapy session with a person diagnosed with schizophrenia.

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3
Jun

Unplug

Get an intimate inside look into a therapy session with a person diagnosed with schizophrenia.
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