Jonathan Harnisch Podcast

30
Jun

10-Minute Morning Vlog on Schizophrenia and Starting Fresh

June 30, 2016; The world isn't all sunshine and rainbows. It is a very mean and nasty place, and I don't care how tough you are, it will beat you to your knees and keep you there permanently if you let it. You, me, or anybody is going to hit it as hard as life. But it is not about how hard you hit. It's about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward.

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24
Jun

Jonathan Harnisch: Life Sucks I’m Just Trying To Live It: An Affirmation of Life (2015)

The title and opening of this 40 min documentary film may be rather misleading, but by its ending, my experience in the hospital last week has been a personal life changer, and may indeed inspire you! ...This hidden gem of a video just might change your life as it did for me documenting three days in the intensive care unit at the UNM Sandoval Regional Medical Center in northern Rio Rancho, New Mexico. Sometimes leaving is harder than staying. "I use my experiences, good and bad to inspire, and I will not stop.' "This [experience] is one sentence in this life story I'm writing, and I'm not the editor, and there ARE typos." — Jonathan Harnisch, 'Life Sucks I'm Just Trying To Live It An Affirmation of Life (2015)'

Comment on Facebook: “I’ve watched quite a few of your videos Jonathan and this one is hardest so far, I'm so glad you had the patient advocate and that she is a great person who connected with you and helped you. It must be awful you don't have any family except for Maureen. Thank goodness she is there for you, who visited you especially when very ill, that makes me sad and angry. You are so f-ing strong so much of the time, how can folk survive in such an endless storm, living with such pain and confusion 24/7? That must be so scary when your health is compromised with all this Tourette's and the salt thing, the water, diabetes and all the other things you have going on. Thank goodness you had the treatment you needed at UNM and met people who care and who can help you. Good luck with all, I hope your health will improve in any small way each day and that you can have more wellness and many good moments in this life. When I said hardest to watch I meant from the position of seeing someone in pain, mental or physical and not being able to help. I went out with a younger lad for five years or more who is schizoaffective, and I was ten years older and had three young children, toddlers really. He was a lovely guy, and I've suffered mental health problems all my life, but I was unprepared for having a boyfriend with this illness. I learnt so much but at first my paranoia and mental ill-health and huge responsibilities meant I struggled to cope with my boyfriend's issues until I got used to him and learned some more empathy plus I was made to feel embarrassed at the age-gap by others, as he was 21 when I met him and were hospitalized a lot at that age, some people were suggesting I was using him for money as well, he actually struggled to get me to accept any help from him as I'm real independent, also cops sometimes would show up at his own home and social-workers and such which used to really upset him and his Dad explained he has to go with them as they'll make sure he does. Just seemed all so brutal and unfair as he was the gentlest and intelligent of people fighting through this awful illness. I showed him lots of self-help stuff to do with outdoor survival and nature which he loves, we cooked, went walks, watch films, just hung out. I did protect him and stand up for him, something I've never managed for myself. Due to my way of life and philosophy he didn't have to try and be someone he was not nor be embarrassed or blamed because of all the weird symptoms (once I had realised the seriousness of the illness) and his inability to cope at times and I believe this helped him detach a bit and just be. His mum was always thanking me and when I attended one of his big psychiatric reviews I became more aware of a bit of what they'd gone through as a family when the poor lad had broken down as a teen and how hard all the medical stuff and treatments had been and how they felt they just hadn't been listened to at all. :( I used every ounce of skills I'd learned to stand up for him at that meeting and helped him to have a voice and for him and his family to start having a say in the lads treatment. It literally was like mutiny! :) I will say I was pretty stressed out, but he actually taught me self-help skills too and helped me with my mental health being able to reassure me that we could both cope and learn new surviving skills! He still lives nearby and is much better more of the time but still reclusive, as am I, but he managed to learn an instrument he's always wanted to and does other creative stuff too, he did some writing, went college. Back then I had no idea about schizophrenia and had been brutalized by others and thought he was doing the things he was doing to make me scared, then I slowly gleaned it was the symptoms of schizophrenia that I was scared of not him and that he could not help how he was being affected, but he was the most decent person to me whilst struggling with his illness. I'm so glad I met him, and there are many I can't say this about. I wear my suit of armour every day. :) ” 
—Mary L.
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24
Jun

You Can’t Do Epic Sh*t With Basic People

June 24, 2016: Facebook Writing Therapy Session

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22
Jun

Fragmentation [Audiovisual Book] by Jonathan Harnisch

Jonathan Harnisch’s postmodern literature relies on narrative techniques such as fragmentation, paradox, and the unreliable narrator. In Fragmentation, Harnisch has outdone himself, for good or ill, with the strangest, saddest, most confusing, and unedited, schizophrenic, psychosexual stream-of-thought narrative imaginable, a work suffused with almost evangelical zeal in the service of disillusion. Author, Jonathan Harnisch has written the bestselling and award-winning novels, Lover in the Nobody, Living Colorful Beauty and When We Were Invincible. He is also a noted controversial mental health advocate, and fine artist, blogger, podcast host, patent holder, hedge fund manager, musician, and film and TV writer and producer.

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22
Jun

Fragmentation [Audiobook] by Jonathan Harnisch

Jonathan Harnisch’s postmodern literature relies on narrative techniques such as fragmentation, paradox, and the unreliable narrator. In Fragmentation, Harnisch has outdone himself, for good or ill, with the strangest, saddest, most confusing, and unedited, schizophrenic, psychosexual stream-of-thought narrative imaginable, a work suffused with almost evangelical zeal in the service of disillusion. Author, Jonathan Harnisch has written the bestselling and award-winning novels, Lover in the Nobody, Living Colorful Beauty and When We Were Invincible. He is also a noted controversial mental health advocate, and fine artist, blogger, podcast host, patent holder, hedge fund manager, musician, and film and TV writer and producer.

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16
Jun

The Finale of Sex Drugs and Schizophrenia by Jonathan Harnisch in High-Definition

BENJAMIN (BEN, BENJY) SCHREIBER has Tourette’s syndrome, which causes him to display uncontrollable tics and hops, and to stutter and swear inappropriately. He is bullied through his school years and can never form firm friendships, especially with women. He is simply incapable of happiness. In his late twenties, he plunges into a downward spiral of drug and alcohol abuse, which culminates in an attempted bank robbery using a cell phone as a fake bomb. He is arrested and placed under psychiatric evaluation, where his psychiatrist, Dr C, quickly sees Ben’s affliction as more than just Tourette’s. Ben is not alone: Inside his head lives GEORGIE GUST, Ben’s alter ego. Georgie is obsessed with his manipulative but extremely sexual next door neighbor CLAUDIA NESBITT and shares a sadomasochistic relationship with her that is supported only by his obsession—Claudia has no love for Georgie. Ben is desperately searching for someone —Claudia Nesbitt as the Perfect Woman—who will provide him the unconditional love that he never received as a boy. He finds it easier to retreat into his mind to share Georgie’s sick obsession with Georgie’s cruel and abusive Claudia than to deal with his real issues. Dr C senses that Ben is suffering from some type of post-traumatic stress that occurred early in Ben’s childhood and that he uses Georgie as an escape when bad memories start to surface. It is up to Dr C to help Ben face the buried terrors of his childhood so that he can finally let go of Georgie and reduce him to the literary character that the writer Ben wants him to be.

Envision a blend of a mentally ill mind with unsurpassed resiliency and fiery intellect and your result would be the brilliant Jonathan Harnisch. An all-around artist, Jonathan writes fiction and screenplays, sketches, imagines, and creates. Produced filmmaker, fine artist, musician, and published erotica author, Jonathan holds myriad accolades, and his works captivate the attention of those who experience it. Manic-toned scripts with parallel lives, masochistic tendencies in sexual escapades, and disturbing clarities embellished with addiction, fetish, lust, and love, are just a taste of themes found in Jonathan's transgressive literature. Conversely, his award-winning films capture the ironies of life, love, self-acceptance, tragedy and fantasy. Jonathan's art evokes laughter and shock, elation and sadness, but overall forces you to step back and question your own version of reality. Scripts, screenplays, and schizophrenia are defining factors of Jonathan's life and reality - but surface labels are often incomplete. Jonathan is diagnosed with several mental illnesses from schizoaffective disorder to Tourette's syndrome; playfully, he dubs himself the "King of Mental Illness." Despite daily symptomatic struggles and thoughts, Jonathan radiates an authentic, effervescent, and loving spirit. His resiliency emanates from the greatest lesson he's learned: laughter. His diagnoses and life experiences encourage him to laugh at reality as others see it. Wildly eccentric, open-minded, passionate and driven, Jonathan has a feral imagination. His inherent traits transpose to his art, making his works some of the most original and thought-provoking of modern day. Jonathan Harnisch's struggles with his mental health conditions are interlinked with the incomprehension of non-sufferers, which provokes him to explain his reality. He has explored a range of media, including film, music, and now the written word, to help the general public understand exactly what it feels like to suffer from schizophrenia. By fictionalizing the day-to-day meetings of multiple personalities, he is illuminating a corner of psychiatry that few understand. As an author with schizophrenia, Jonathan Harnisch is ideally placed to share the unusual perception commonly defined as 'mental illness'. Harnisch is not dealing with an altered reality, but a double reality. His main characters, Ben Schreiber and Georgie Gust, perfectly illustrate how two lives can share the same body.
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12
Jun

The Day I Decided to Take Charge of My Life

Schizophrenia is a chronic and severe mental disorder that affects how a person thinks, feels, and behaves. People with schizophrenia may seem like they have lost touch with reality. Although schizophrenia is not as common as other mental disorders, the symptoms can be very disabling.

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4
Jun

Porcelain Utopia [Audiobook]

Ben Schreiber suffers from a range of physical and psychiatric disorders, ranging from Tourette's syndrome to narcissism, borderline personality, and schizoaffective disorder. He is hospitalized after a drug-crazed attempt at a bank robbery and is now under the care of Dr C, a female psychiatrist. Ben has little faith that psychiatric medicine will help him rid his mind of the delusions and hallucinations that his disorder presents, as it has done little for him thus far. He also knows that Dr C will not be treating him alone: He must introduce her to the cast of characters that share his brain, including Ben's alter ego, Georgie Gust. Ben/Georgie are not classic "split" personalities: Georgie is a hallucination that springs from Ben's disease and physically shares Ben's life, making his symptoms even worse. Dr. C begins to suspect that Ben draws upon Georgie to help him avoid the bad memories that he has suppressed for his entire life and that underlie his post-traumatic stress and anxiety. She must try to get Ben to explore his relationship with Georgie, and the sexual fetishes that are triggered by Claudia Nesbitt, Georgie's highly sexual and manipulative girlfriend, so that Ben can become once again the loving person he once was. She encourages Ben to talk about Georgie and Claudia in their sessions, and more importantly, to write about them as therapy. Ben discovers that writing gives him increasing freedom from the obsessive invasion of his thoughts by Georgie and Claudia and from his dreadful past memories that Dr C slowly uncovers. He begins to hope that converting Georgie to a literary character in the pages of an autobiographical novel will slowly remove him, along with Claudia, from Ben's mind forever.

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2
Jun

The Finale of Sex, Drugs, and Schizophrenia by Jonathan Harnisch

"Let's get the facts straight up front, to avoid any confusion later," the author states at the start of this wild, candid book. "I am a person first, a human being, just like anyone else. Maybe a little different, that's all." That difference is a diagnosis of schizophrenia, and this extensive work explores the realities of mental illness through a whirlwind of fictional, narrative pieces and personal reflections. Along the way, it takes readers to places of depravity and confusion. Its characters include Ben Schreiber, a precocious but mentally ill youngster in Armani jeans, who explains his troubled life to the ever-calm Dr. C, after trying to rob a bank with a cellphone. Schreiber discusses his alter ego, Georgie Gust, a masochist and foot-fetishist, who's wealthy enough to pay his neighbor Claudia to torture him; indeed, he seems capable of enduring any type of humiliation, so long as it doesn't involve actually working. The first-person narrator regularly interrupts the proceedings to offer generally off-topic details: "(Parenthetical Pet Peeve) Commercials for unappetizing products shown at meal times...feminine hygiene products, jock itch, yeast infections, etc." The scattered narrative uses diverse literary mechanisms, to say the least, mixing elements such as journal entries, a screenplay, a straightforward melodrama involving a Tourette's sufferer at a private school, occasional celebrity name-dropping ("I met Joanna Cassidy, Dick Van Dyke, Robert Downey Jr, Mel Gibson, and others"), and a dapper figure named John Marshal, who, when asked his opinion of a party, responds, "I'd scarcely be a good judge of that.... My life is taken up with writing." Making sense of it all in any traditional way, it would seem, isn't really the point. From horrific scenes of child abuse ("She did. She raped me. My grandmother") to glimpses of triumph ("I can start taking control of my life"), this long book's many scenes of anguish and hope are difficult to take in, by any estimation. Whether readers will find the difficulty worthwhile depends largely on their tolerance for twisted tales. 

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1
Jun

Good Morning Facebook! [May 31 2016]

Being honest may not get you a lot of friends, but it'll always get me the right ones.
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1
Jun

Jonathan Harnisch Facebook Page Update May 28 2016

Being honest may not get you a lot of friends, but it'll always get me the right ones.
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1
Jun

Early Morning Facebook Live Broadcast Saturday May 28 2016

Being honest may not get you a lot of friends, but it'll always get me the right ones.
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